click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
WETA 113
LANGUAGE
English 113
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 113 (some duplicates have been removed)
." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. a suicide bomber strikes the u.s. embassy in turkey. killing two and injuring many more. as he tries to make his way into the building. saying good-bye to the secretary. hillary clinton bids farewell to the state department after four years at the helm. >> i hope that you will continue to make yourselves, make me and make our country proud. thank you all and god bless you. >> and seven years after hurricane katrina, the superdome in new orleans gets ready to host the super bowl in the big easy signature style. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. tonight the obama administration denounces the assault on the u.s. embassy in turkey as a terrorist attack. a suicide bomber blew himself up at a security gate killing a turkish security guard and injuring those nearby. according to turkish prime minister, an outlawed marxist group is responsible for the violence. our james reynolds is on the scene and filed this report. >> america's foreign missions are as much fortresses as embassies. this is why.
. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
." >> this is "bbc world news america." on the floor of the u.s. senate, protesters delay the confirmation hearing for america's next spy chief. teargas and riot police on the streets of tunis as the country's fledgling democracy struggles to survive a crisis we know it is not good for us but it is not fun, but why are so many people doing it? fledglingntry's democracy struggles to survive. we know that it is not good for us, but wire so many people doing it? welcome to our viewers on public television in america. america's drone program came -- undere nomination fire at the nomination hearing for john brennan. the man that president obama has tapped to be his next spy chief says that the white house goes through agony to make sure that there are no collateral deaths in these attacks. >> a panel of senators brimming with questions. barely a few words in, the first interruption but not from politicians. >> i am honored to appear before you today as the president's nominee. >> would you hold please? i will ask the police to please remove this woman. >> four times, protesters interrupted at the heari
eliminating hunger and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: jamie williams is a noted author. she is -- amy wilentz is a noted author. her latest revisits the nation of haiti. it is called "farewell, fred voodoo." we should start by talking about the title. >> friend voodoo is a name the international press corps used to name for the haitian on the street. what i would like to say is they are trained to go deeper than that and not just have a stereotypical view of haitians and what old colonists used to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets --
. the u.s. airways/american airlines merger is ready for take-off, and the companies say they see no turbulence ahead from washington regulators. and senate democrats offer their plan to head off the sequester's sharp spending cuts. we get the details from michigan senator debbie stabenow. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r." two big sweetheart deals on this valentine's day: american airlines is merging with u.s. airways, creating the world's largest airline company; and warren buffett is buying h.j. heinz, the biggest food company acquisition ever. we'll have more on american in a moment, but we begin tonight with buffett and that surprising mega-food deal. the billionaire investor is teaming up with the billionaire owners of 3g capital to buy the ketchup maker for $28 billion. the private equity group and buffett's berkshire hathaway are paying $72.50 a share in cash. that's a 20% premium over heinz's closing price yesterday. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: the oracle of omaha now has a new title: ketchup king. for the first time, warren waomett, who's shifr ay working
of last year, there are fresh worries about the state of the u.s. economy and profits for this year. on top of that, financial conditions in the eurozone are still a threat to u.s. stocks. >> with the market at current levels, which... basically looks like they're priced for perfection, there doesn't leave a lot of room for any disappointing news. and there are a lot of areas that could create disappointing news. >> reporter: weissberg says many market pros believe stocks are headed higher, but they need a catalyst, and that's unlikely to come from tonight's state of the union. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why ailing smartphone maker blackberry is hoping the sports market will help it on its road to recovery. we'll explain in tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." a "silly sideshow--" that's what apple c.e.o. tim cook called a recent lawsuit filed by hedge fund manager david einhorn. speaking at a goldman sachs technology conference today, cook also said apple is considering einhorn's proposal to issue preferred stock and return more money to shareholders. e
the u.s. embassy in turkey's capital was an "act of terror," said a white house spokesman today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the deadly blast from a reporter on the scene in ankara. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports on a widening divide between israelis and palestinians after more than a decade of starts and stops in peace talks. >> warner: thousands of israeli shoppers used to drive up this road to take advantage of the bargains in the palestinian shops just ahead. the popular shopping district has become a virtual ghost town. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds holding international stocks. by comparison, mutual funds holding u.s. stocks suffered their first outflows of the year. investment advisors say small investors may be on to something. >> international investing has had a bad reputation over the last couple of years had a bad experience, people have taken money ou
-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't ruled it out and down the road they may reconsider it. and really the emphasis
in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: on the comeback trail, hewlett packard posting better than expected first quarter results tonight, as a wide- ranging revamp of the struggling computer maker takes hold. and its shares take flight, rising over 6% in after hours trading. h.p. earned $0.82 a share, $0.11 better than wall street had anticipated. and revenues, while down at $28.4 billion, also beat the street. c.e.o. meg whitman has been on the job 17 months, speaking with investors today, whitman said she felt good about the rest of the year, and that last year's hard work was paying off for h.p. but, analysts say h.p. is not out of the woods yet. >> it's the type of thing that can be fixed quickly. this isn't going to take several years to play out so first of all it seems like meck whitman's vision is very much on track but we're not seeing that play out in the financials, but it is encouraging that guidance wa
. andrew harding, timbuktu. >> and now to the memo that shows the u.s. government's role for when drone attacks can be launched to kill american citizens. the justice department that the government does not need evidence that a specific attack is imminent. more lenient standards then publicly known for drug -- drone attacks. here is steve kingston. and under what exact circumstances will the u.s. government authorized the killing of an american citizen abroad? but the answers are here. it is a 16-page memo written by the lawyers of the justice department, as requested by congress. it is a document that is not strictly classified, but it was not meant to become public. what these lawyers do here is justified is targeted killing of american citizens who have worked with or parts of al qaeda and expense various groups. that is the justification if they pose a an immense threat to america. it provides a very elastic definition of what is an imminent threat. you do not need to know this is a bit of who, what, where, and when of a particular plot against america. it is enough for these indivi
that includes a billionaire warren buffet. the deal is believed to be the largest in the food industry. u.s. airways and american airlines have announced they are joining forces. the merger creates the world's biggest airline in terms of miles flown by passengers around the world. we have this from new york. >> the courtship is over and now they are making it permanent. u.s. airways announced its merger with american airlines. [applause] it was the closest thing to a marriage ceremony. the u.s. airways to executive counted the benefits of this union. >> these are two highly complementary airlines. the 900 route we fly individually. when you add them up, there are only 12 of them that have overlap. this is really about providing better service to customers. it creates a nice third competitor to the two larger airlines. our view is it increases competition, doesn't decrease competition. >> the deal will save the combines company's $11 billion per year. united shareholders will own 28% of the stock while american shareholders will own the remaining 72%. this deal will help rescue it from bankr
angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo- haris, who offers a complex portrait of the woman best known for refusing to give up her seat on an alabama bus in 1955. >> she is celebrated for one act and i think part of that celebration puts it all in the past, right, when the actual rosa parks keeps working on racial and social justice issues all the way up t
york. >> susie: even though those retail numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europs central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and wurle the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 l
by groups opposed to economic reform, on top of that, u.s. equities face a looming friday deadli b budget cuts, known as "sequestration." t dow tumbled 216 points, the nasdaq fell nearly 46, and the s&p 500 lost 28 points. while there's been much talk of a correction in the stock market, sequestration may not be the catalyst. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: it is widely accepted on wall street thatt sequestration is coming. and, with it a new reason for the fragile u.s. economy to sputter. but, what will the first phase of billions of dollars in federal spending cuts actually do to the u.s. stock market? after all, major market averages are hovering close to all-time highs, and don't forget investors are finally warming up to equities again. floor broker art cashin says today's selling was mostly a reaction to italy's election, and that the stock market is not yet focused on sequestration. >> i don't think that even we slip into sequestration it will have the same dramatic effect that the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling had. it is seen as somewhat temporary. >> reporter: others say
, and investors are seeing in the u.s. economy. we preview the economic state of the union. why regulators need to treat them like other business. then u.s. airways sees big benefits in merging with american airlines. we look at the new landscape for airlines if the deal goes through. we have that anmore tonight on nbr. president obama is preparing to deliver his first state of the union address of his new term, tomorrow. the american people will be listening carefully to his plans to grow the economy, especially as they struggle with less take home pay, and worries about their jobs. while there are signs of improvement in the economy, the unemployment rate rose in january to 7.9%. so what is the current state of the economy? erika miller talked to two experts with different views. >> reporter: it may seem strange to many investors that the stock market can be hovering at five- year highs, when the economy is so weak. but what's fueling the rally is not the current situation, it's hope. >> we've taken out some of the downside tail risks. so, we're feeling like although it's not going to be a bo
of the chinese military cyber-attacks against the u.s.? we will show you what we found. today it was her comments about the duchess of cambridge that caused a firestorm. >> she is roughly four months pregnant. there is evidence of a rather more rounded stomach than before. the pregnancy sickness of early december has passed gadd kathrin is still taking things carefully. last week she and william were on holiday. she was fulfilling her first public engagement for some weeks, visiting a center in south london that helps women recover from drug and alcohol dependency. she has become the focus of unflattering comments by hilary mantell. she described how the media has transition to a fashionable world catches. >> i saw kate becoming a jointed doll on which certain thinigs ngs are hung. she has no personality of her own. entirely defined by what she wore. >> she said the person who emerged from the transition seems machine made. catherine was defended by the chief executive of the charity which she visited today and of which she is a patron. >> all i can speak of is what i now. my experience of the du
rain and snow, but not on saturdays. the u.s. postal service is dropping saturday letter deliveries to save billions. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. fresh pain at the pump. american drivers see a steep jump in gas prices: up 15 cents a gallon in the past week alone. >> susie: and the federal reserve says it's been hit, by cyber hackers. we look at u.s. businesses and just how safe their networks are. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. postal service says this summer it will stop delivering mail on saturdays, ending a service that began 150 years ago. cutting back to a five-day a week schedule will save $2- billion. the post office has been losing about $20 million a day, as e- mail useage ramps up and mail volume plunges. congress has required the post office to deliver six days a week, but the postmaster general believes there is a loophole in the law that will allow him to make the change. darren gersh reports on the business fallout. >> reporter: first class mail is the postal service's most profitable product. it is also a business that is disappearing at the
a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankruph parent company a.l r.il wown 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 employees. >> our best goal going forward is to make it the biggest, strongest airline in the country, and i suppose that's about to happen. >> brown: the combined company will keep the american name and headquarters in fort worth, texas. but it is u.s. airways c.e.o. doug parker who will run it. his counterpart-- tom horton at american-- will serve as chairman, but bow out after the transition the two are friends who started their careers together at american three decades ago. >> to run a ne
to this exchange with lindsey graham. >> name one person who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the u.s. senate. >> the use of intimidation -- i should have used influence. >> he could not name one person publicly. this is gamesmanship of the first order. you have conversations with plenty members of congress, and they feel one way about some of the issues in the middle east and feel they simply cannot move an inch on questions involving israel. >> is chuck hagel in command of the issues that he will be grappling with here? >> i do not think anybody would have come off well. it was a halting performance by chuck hagel, and chuck hagel, to underline what nina said earlier, is not a verbally- nimble person. he is not known for sound bites, not somebody that you go to if you want a quotation on a deadline. he will give you thought full context. >> god forbid. [laughter] >> more than anything else, i could not get over the back during quality. yes or no, yes or no, senator. john mccain was looking for vindication for the surge. chuck hagel was not going to give it to him. >> john mccain is not the
together. >> do you expect his successor to have a change relative to the u.s.? >> there are going to be some challenges -- channels of communications. i do not expect best friends between america and united states but i expect the town to get better. it is in a terrible state. they have the highest inflation in latin america. they have food court -- of food shortages all over the place. that is why hugo chavez has come back to calm things down. they are in for a rough time. >> any guess on who the successor might be? >> his current vice-president is in the best position. hugo chavez designated him in december. he does not have his charisma, but he is in the strongest position right now. >> in other news, a former u.s. prosecutor house called for the international court to investigate war crimes in syria. he is working on an inquiry into the syrian conflict, reporting on human-rights violations of both sides. including the use of mass executions and the imprisonment of children. evidence has gathered more than 500 syrian refugees. people have been reported to be wounded in a clash
. one more item from the world of sports but the u.s. government has joined a lawsuit against lance armstrong after talks with his lawyers broke down. the suit argues armstrong defrauded the american public by insisting he was not using drugs will writing for the u.s. postal service team. last month, he admitted using performance enhancing drugs. this weekend, italian voters must decide do they trust to get their ailing country moving again. the choice includes a former communist an outspoken comedian, berlusconi, and economic technocrat mario monti. our europe editor has more. naples in the final hours of campaigning in the italian general election but europe fears the result could cause tremors any euro zone. an ex-orites to win is communist. away from the public rallies, he had this message for europe. >> i intend to convince your of the that austerity is not enough. i do not believe european policies are correct. they need to be adjusted to take more account of investment and jobs. >> he promises to reduce the deficit any sense the mood in italy is disillusioned and angry. canch
world. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org.
!." there is a u.s. tour also under way. we are glad you joined us. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hungerwalmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. tavis: this month marks the 50th anniversary of the animals. eric burden's career has continued as a solo artist and with a group war. his latest album is called "til your river runs dry!" >> ♪ mother, tell your children, not to do what i have done ♪ ♪ spend your life in sheer misery, in the house of the rising sun ♪ tavis: does it feel like five decades? >> if i look at some of them. >> you did not like that suit? >> not really. thought was a time. it was so rough doing stuff like that. it was shot at 9:00 in the morning, and it was shot in a pan of vision, and why and blends, you are not ready for that kind of stuff. i was happy without sonders and what abo
explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad mortgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if and wek titerthal and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viki
because of the legal journey. khalid el-masri also had cases here in the united states. and the u.s. courts actually refused to look into the merits of those claims, looking at things like the state secrets privilege or different types of immunities that would keep him as a torture victim from being vindicated in u.s. courts. so in fact what i think is the lesson here is not so much that the european courts could make those findings. it's that the european court did make those findings. >> you mean he couldn't have gotten a fair trial or the courts wouldn't at least give him a trial in this country? >> in this country, very few of the post-9/11 torture victims have ever had their day in court. and in fact, until recently the center for constitutional rights has been successful in a settlement. we got $5.2 million from u.s. corporations who were involved in harsh interrogation and torture in abu ghraib for 72 torture victims. but none of those cases have gone through adjudications. no court has made a finding the way that the european court did about the circumstances of their tortur
oil spill. on monday in new orleans, the civil trial pitting the u.s. government and gulf coast states against b.p. is due to begin. ruben ramirez has a preview of the case and the possibility of a last minute deal. >> reporter: nearly three years after a rig explosion killed 11 people and spilled four million barrels of oil into the gulf of mexico the u.s. government and b.p. are set to square off in a louisiana courtroom. b.p. has a history of settling civil cases before or during trial, so an eleventh hour deal could still be reached. the justice department and gulf states are considering offering b.p. a $16 billion deal, that's nearly three times what b.p. had hoped to pay. for it's part, b.p. says: >> we have always been open to settlements on reasonable terms, faced with demands that are excessive and not based on reality or the merits of the case, we are going to trial. >> reporter: if there is no settlement over the weekend, well owner b.p. will be joined by rig owner transocean and halliburton, the cement services provider on the well. on the other side will be the justice de
." but the cash-strapped u.s. postal service will eliminate mail delivery on saturdays. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we talk with postmaster general patrick donahoe. >> brown: then, president obama picks r.e.i. executive sally jewell to run the interior department. we look at how the cabinet is shaping up with many posts yet to fill. >> ifill: we have two stories from the middle east. margaret warner gets the latest from tunisia, the birthplace of the arab spring, where a leading opposition figure was assassinated today. >> brown: and ray suarez reports on the plight of syrian refugees who've fled to lebanon. >> at this tent camp in al-marj, in the eastern part of lebanon's bekaa valley-- only 25 miles from the syrian border-- refugees are struggling to adapt to a new, impermanent reality. >> ifill: and we close with a look at what's happening with the boy scouts, as they struggle to decide whether to lift a long-standing ban on openly gay members. >> brown: that'eaalahl d on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour h
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundation and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to r
followed north korea's launch of a satellite in december. the u.s. and others had warned that the rocket could also be used to carry nuclear weapons. today's nuclear test sent the u.n. security council back into emergency meetings to discuss yet more sanctions. u.s. ambassador susan rice. >> the actions of north korea are a threat to regional peace and security, international peace and security. they are not acceptable. they will not be tolerated. and they will be met with north korea's increasing isolation and pressure under united states sanctions. >> brown: in washington a state department official confirmed that pong jiang had informed the u.s. of its intention to test a nuclear device but had given no date. other nations joined in a wave of condemnation including the russian foreign minister who was in south africa. >> from what we have heard today, pyongyang violated its commitment and deserves condemnation because it ignored the norms of international laws. >> brown: even china, the north's lone major ally voiced its, quote, staunch opposition. it urged north korea to return to it
concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy
pratt has more. >> reporter: stuck in neutral. that seems to be the best cliche for the u.s. job market, right now. the nation's unemployment rate has been lurking just around 8% for the last six months. and, the number of news jobs created is barely keeping pace with population growth. still, some economists think the latest labor data is encouraging. >> when we look at the number of jobs being created even though it was a tad below expectations, it was still a healthy number that should continue to help the economy. >> reporter: the main reason for optimism: those positive revisions to november and december jobs data. it turns out, the government underestimated how many positions were added by 127,000. it was that miscount that helped push the dow over 14,000 for the first time in more than five years. and, at 14,000 the blue-chip index is about 150 to 200 points away from its all-time high. market pros like wayne kaufman predict new highs for stocks in coming weeks. >> many investors, retail investors, individual investors are reaching the point of recognition where they no longer be
the internet in the first place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petition site, you'll see how fans of "captive audience" are ca
department's view that it is legal for the government to kill u.s. citizens overseas if it believes they pose an "imminent threat," even if there is no evidence of an immediate specific attack. some ethicists say that amounts to illegal targeted killings. >> they are not the best strategy, they are not ethically right, and they are not morally right. >>> after much campaigning by outside groups on both sides, the boy scouts postponed until may a decision on lifting its ban on gay scouts and leaders. several conservative religious organizations were particularly vocal in their opposition to lifting the ban. there was also some religious support for changing the policy. about 70% of boy scout troops are sponsored by religious groups, the largest of which are mormons, followed by united methodists and catholics. >>> as faith groups continue to push for comprehensive immigration reform, some are now raising concerns over president obama's support for same-sex couples in his plan. the president wants to give same-sex couples the same rights as heterosexual couples, including the right to sponsor a
is members of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, which saudi arabia has long been working with the u.s. to fight. the pace of drone strikes has been growing rapidly in recent years. american officials said the first time the cia used the base was to kill this man, and wore out milwaukee kill thuis -- to kil this man. \ supporters say strikes like this have seriously damaged out kind of costs -- damaged al qaeda possibility to plan a tax, but others say they alienate local populations. brennan will have to answer questions in his confirmation hearing as cia director. the legality of drone strikes is likely to be high on the agenda, especially after a memo was leaked. white house 3 did the white house defended the policy. >> we have a knowledge there are sometimes we use remotely piloted aircraft against terrorists and to prevent attacks on the united states and to save american lives. we conduct the strikes because they are necessary to prevent threats, to stop future attacks, and save american lives. these attacks are ethical and wires. >> the fact there is a secret base may mean some
of troops stationed in south korea. the u.s. and allies may respond by putting their forces on higher alert and building new missile defenses. that will make for more attention and instability in asia. kim jong-un has his finger on the nuclear trigger. he may find himself more isolated and threatened, not more secure. he's already warning that any new sanctions may lead to new nuclear tests. the bbc news, seoul. >> more threatened. that is a worrying prospect. i am joined by the senior adviser for east asia policy at the u.s. defense department. thank you for coming in. what do we know about this latest test? >> the details are still coming in. we think it was more powerful and relatively successful than previous tests in 2006-2009. we're still trying to figure out whether it was using plutonium or highly enriched uranium. >> what is the significant? >> highly enriched uranium would be new. they have limited stockpiles of plutonium carried they would use that up in their testing process. >> we have the united nations saying this is a threat to international security. how much is that true?
hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> with a new pope about to be chosen in rome and the church under severe criticism for its handling of sexual-abuse cases, what is the path forward for the more than 77 million american catholics? a professor of theological ethics at loyola marymount university, raised catholic, dr. gina messina-dysert. deeply engaged in the ongoing debate about the future of catholicism in america. professor, good to have you on this program. >> thank you so much. tavis: let me start with the obvious. many of us, even those of us who are not catholic, this has not happened in 600 years, so it has not happened in our lifetimes, that we have had an ex-pope. >> certainly, this is a significant historical event. this is the first pope to step down in 600 years and one of only 10 in the entire history of the catholic church. people are really curious what this means. will it is rin
industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is going to try to capture those markets. >> they want to continue to be a hardware player, but the questio
than one hundred u.s. corporations and organizations. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we assess the damage done by the cyber attacks, and explore the motivations behind what appear to be china's systematic targeting of foreign firms and governments. >> woodruff: then, we turn to today's arguments at the supreme court over a patent case with implications for biotechnology giant monsanto, and a range of fields from medical research to computer software. >> ifill: we continue our weeklong focus on guns, "after newtown." tonight jeffrey brown reports on the possible links, if any, between violent video games and violent behavior. >> the result clearly shows that playing a violent video game increases aggressive behavior. >> one of the problems in this field is that people confuse aggression and violence. >> woodruff: and margaret warner gets an update on the oscar pistorius murder trial in south africa, as the prosecution and the defense lay out conflicting accounts of the events leading to his girlfriend's death. that's all ahead on
, measure what that means for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan out. eventually some kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? do we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you kn
abuse by priests. also, this week, the president of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops, cardinal timothy dolan of new york was formally questioned by lawyers for sex abuse victims. the deposition centered on dolan's handling of abuse while he oversaw the milwaukee archdiocese. >>> as president obama this week urged congress to prevent massive federal spending cuts from going into effect march 1st, many religious groups argued the so-called sequester would disproportionately impact low-income americans. although social security, medicare and some anti-poverty programs are protected, the groups pointed to likely cuts in programs that provide food and other assistance. they called those cuts unconscionable and immoral. >>> human rights and religious freedom advocates are ramping up pressure on iran to release an iranian-born american christian pastor who was recently sentenced to eight years in prison there. saeed abedini was convicted last month of threatening iran's national security by helping to expand the house church movement. 80 members of the u.s. congress wrote to secretary
alone. people feel oppressed by a regime that will quite literally stop at nothing. >> the u.s. defense secretary wanted to arm the syrian rebels, but the white house did not want to. do you think there is a chance the white house might change its mind? >> i think it is inevitable with the change of team, particularly yith secretary of state carrkerr coming in, but there has to be a complete revamping of strategy. that may be a decision they come with. >> you think it would tips the balance at this point? >> what i would support as the united states making a move to form a relationship with carefully vetted rebel groups. i think the united states has come to the conclusion armed people on the ground are going to be dictating a series of's future -- dictating syria's future. it could include training, tactical intelligence, non- legal the equipment. i think it is essential if the ignited states do -- if the united states wants to exert influence. >> do you think they are in danger of not exerting influence? >> i think the president of the united states has certain reservations about gett
. >> as iran struggles with its uncertain future, here in the u.s., there is a dose of economic tug-of-war. right now, the two political parties are deadlocked over how cuts knowne spending as the sequester that will go into effect on friday. today, president obama was in newport news, va. stressing his case. here is the report. >> along virginia coastline, it seems almost everyone works for the military in one way or another and with a sense of dread about the future. all the ships come to this yard to be refitted and repaired. but the navy has worn them that the looming cuts mean work will be cancelled on 13 ships. three --ny has told 3500 workers they could be laid off. it is a story that could be repeated all over america. >> it could affect a lot of people. not just shipyard people. wohlschlegel down to everybody. the uniformed people -- it will trickle down to everybody. the uniformed people. the diners down the street. it could put this country in the worst depression since the '20s. >> it takes a lot to>> it couldf scare the military, but they seem rattled by the proposed cu
, but why is it causing the u.s. stock market to dive? welcome to our viewers on public at telik -- public television in america and also around the globe. britain most -- britain's most senior catholic has thrust the succession plans into question. cardinal keith o'brien has stepped down after being accused of inappropriate behavior with priests. he was due to take part in the conclave to elect the successor to pope benedict, but will now not be going to rome. our religious correspondent has the details. >> for a decade and more, he has been one of scotland's biggest personalities and strongest voices. then came allegations that cardinal o'brien behaved inappropriately towards four priests in his care during the 1980's. suddenly, he is out of office. today, cardinal o'brien stayed behind closed doors. in a statement, he acknowledged his poor health, but made no attempt to rebut the allegations against him. instead he said, for any good i have been able to do, i thank god. for any failures, i apologize to him all whom i have asked to all whom i have -- i apologize to all whom i have offend
broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into ir
the exchange rate -- >> the yen has fallen 10%. >> however, who will criticize japan? we in the u.s. engaged in quantitative easing. not a lot of people will accuse japan at this stage. he has room for abenomics. he has a 71% support rate with confidence in the community. but if he doesn't restructure -- it will probably run out of steam. >> to what extent is the meeting tomorrow between obama and abe a meeting about china? >> even the japanese economy is about china. the american economy relies on them for the military and -- to maintain a stable balance of power in action -- they are concerned of a change in power. chinese growth makes the japanese economy important. and they will talk about china. >> they have to have japan act -- the second and third largest economies in china and japan, and japan is the counterbalance. >> the u.s. doesn't have the ability to stop china's growth, and will the major economies have the clout to write the rules and set the norms that make sure china's rise is useful. >> we could be talking ofut the security concerns china and japan. this is almost the same,
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: taj mahal's eclectic career braces blues, jazz, americana. nine grammy nominations. he has been on a musical odyssey. that journey can be heard now in a new boxed set includes 15 cds, 170 tracks. here is a small taste of this remarkable compilation. >> ♪ if i ever get out of this prison, i am going to do just like i please ♪ ♪ i am going to take off running to the nearest stretch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to keep running, running, running through the years bunch of trees -- the nearest bunch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to be running through these trees ♪ ♪daddy going to be running so fast it looks like daddy been running on his knees ♪ tavis: you just mentioned daddy, and i think that is a great way to start. tell me about your daddy's record collection. >> he is an interesting guy. my grandparents came here about 100 years ago and started having children in new york city. my dad was born in 1915, and everybody is going to notice you h
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 113 (some duplicates have been removed)